Creatine pure

29.99 лв.

Creatine

Primary Information, Benefits, Effects, and Important Facts

 

What is creatine?

Creatine is a molecule produced in the body. It stores high-energy phosphate groups in the form of phosphocreatine. Phosphocreatine releases energy to aid cellular function during stress. This effect causes strength increases after creatine supplementation, and can also benefit the brain, bones, muscles, and liver. Most of the benefits of creatine are a result of this mechanism.

Creatine can be found in some foods, mostly meat, eggs, and fish. Creatine supplementation confers a variety of health benefits and has neuroprotective and cardioprotective properties. It is often used by athletes to increase both power output and lean mass.

Stomach cramping can occur when creatine is supplemented without sufficient water. Diarrhea and nausea can occur when too much creatine is supplemented at once, in which case doses should be spread out throughout the day and taken with meals.

So what does creatine do?

Creatine can help with exercise performance by rapidly producing energy during activity. Creatine may also provide cognitive benefits.


Things to Know

Also Known As: creatine monohydrate, creatine 2-oxopropanoate, a-methylguanidinoacetic acid.
Do Not Confuse With: creatinine (metabolite), cyclocreatine (analogue), creatinol O-phosphate (analogue)

Things to Note:

There have been some anecdotal reports of a subtle but noticeable stimulatory effect on alertness, but this may be a placebo effect.
There have been some anecdotal reports of restlessness when creatine is supplemented less than an hour before falling asleep.
The water retention usually seen with higher loading doses can exceed five pounds (more than two kilograms). Lower doses may cause less water retention. While water mass is not muscle mass (though both count as lean mass), prolonged creatine supplementation results in an increased rate of muscle growth.
Hyperhydration strategies (creatine plus glycerol) appear inefficacious as drug-masking strategies.

Is used for Muscle Gain and Exercise

Also used for Anti-aging and Longevity Cognitive Function and Brain Health

Goes Well With; Carbohydrates (see here), Caffeine (see here), Beta-alanine (see here), Alpha-Lipoic Acid (see here), Leucine, due to mTOR activation (see here), HMB (see here), a metabolite of leucine.

 

How to Take

Recommended dosage, active amounts, other details:

There are many different forms of creatine available on the market, but creatine monohydrate is the cheapest and most effective. Another option is micronized creatine monohydrate, which dissolves in water more easily and can be more practical.

Creatine monohydrate can be supplemented through a loading protocol. To start loading, take 0.3 grams per kilogram of bodyweight per day for 5–7 days, then follow with at least 0.03 g/kg/day either for three weeks (if cycling) or indefinitely (without additional loading phases).

For a 180 lb (82 kg) person, this translates to 25 g/day during the loading phase and 2.5 g/day afterward, although many users take 5 g/day due to the low price of creatine and the possibility of experiencing increased benefits. Higher doses (up to 10 g/day) may be beneficial for people with a high amount of muscle mass and high activity levels or for those who are non-responders to the lower 5 g/day dose.

Stomach cramping can occur when creatine is supplemented without sufficient water. Diarrhea and nausea can occur when too much creatine is supplemented at once, in which case doses should be spread out over the day and taken with meals.

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Frequently Asked Questions

Questions and answers regarding Creatine.

Q: Do you need to cycle creatine?
A: You do not need to cycle creatine.
Read full answer to “Do you need to cycle creatine?”

Q: Can creatine cause cancer?
A: There is no evidence that creatine can cause cancer or has any link to cancer.
Read full answer to “Can creatine cause cancer?”

Q: Does creatine benefit elite athletes?
A: Creatine benefits all exercise for all individuals when it is strength based. However, this
benefit does appear to be less noticeable to elite athletes than it does to novice athletes.
Read full answer to “Does creatine benefit elite athletes?”

Q: When should I take creatine?
A: You should take creatine at any given time – you do not need to time it, nor do you need to cycle creatine.
Read full answer to “When should I take creatine?”

Q: Is creatine safe for your kidneys?
A: In people with healthy kidneys, long-term creatine supplementation is safe, but there are no long-term creatine studies in people with kidney issues. For these people, using a low dose of creatine (if any) would be prudent.
Read full answer to “Is creatine safe for your kidneys?”

Q: Does creatine cause hair loss?
A: It’s plausible, but unlikely. One RCT linked creatine supplementation to an increase in DHT — an androgen involved in hair loss — but this RCT has never been replicated.
Read full answer to “Does creatine cause hair loss?”
Q: What is creatine nitrate?
Read full answer to “What is creatine nitrate?”

Q: Can creatine increase your testosterone levels?
A: There is no convincing evidence that creatine can increase your testosterone levels.Read full answer to “Can creatine increase your testosterone levels?”

Q: Do I need to load creatine?
A: You do not need to load creatine. it can be used as diagnosis to see if you ‘respond’ to creatine or to get slightly quicker benefits but in the long run loading is not a requirement of creatine supplementation. No harm in it either, except perhaps digestive discomfort.
full answer to “Do I need to load creatine?”

Q: Is creatine a steroid?
A: Creatine is not a steroid. It bears no relation to a steroid structurally or in its actions.
Read full answer to “Is creatine a steroid?”

Q: Does caffeine counteract creatine?
A: There is very little evidence that caffeine counteracts the benefits of creatine.
Read full answer to “Does caffeine counteract creatine?”

Q: What is the best form of creatine?
A: Creatine monohydrate is the cheapest form of creatine. It is also the form whose benefits are best supported by the evidence.
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Q: Is creatine safe?
A: Creatine is absolutely safe.
Read full answer to “Is creatine safe?”

 

Q: What happens if I go off of creatine?
Read full answer to “What happens if I go off of creatine?”

Additional information

Weight 272. kg